Boo Bicycles - NAHBS

North American Handmade Bicycle Show – Final Post

Sycip Designs – Santa Rosa, California

This bike was built as a do-it-all travel bike. Cyclocross at heart, it has rack and fender mounts for touring, and clearance for large enough tires to hit light singletrack if the opportunity presents. Note the Sycip signature segmented seatstay junction and coin caps, and fixed post mount disc on the fork.

Sycip Designs - NAHBS

Sycip Designs - NAHBS

Sycip Designs - NAHBS  Sycip Designs - NAHBS

Sycip Designs - NAHBS

Sycip Designs - NAHBS

Sycip Designs - NAHBS

Pedalino Bikes – Lenexa, Kansas

Framebuilding and fabrication is even more male dominated than the rest of the bicycle industry — it’s always refreshing to see a female builder amongst the bearded masses. Julie Ann Pedalino (yes, that’s her real name) is an apprentice builder out of Kansas, and while she only has four frames to her name you’d be hard pressed to see evidence of it with this road bike. This bike attracted some extra attention behind the scenes in the photo booth, it has a certain understated beauty to the white/gold colorway and brazed on extras.

Pedalino Bikes - NAHBS

Pedalino Bikes - NAHBS

Pedalino Bikes - NAHBS

Pedalino Bikes - NAHBS

Pedalino Bikes - NAHBS  Pedalino Bikes - NAHBS Pedalino Bikes - NAHBS

Pedalino Bikes - NAHBS

Boo Bicycles – Fort Collins, Colorado

Bamboo bicycle construction has been a part of NAHBS for years now, becoming a well established and respected material to choose from, especially for comfort over the long haul. The frame tubes are grown on a private bamboo plantation in Vietnam, and prior to assembly are hollowed out to a 3-5mm wall thickness and notched much the same as a ferrous tube would be. Once fit together, the joints are bound with unidirectional carbon fiber, meaning the main bamboo frame tubes extend the entire way to the joint. Boo Bicycles has an impressive array of bikes, with this gravel endurance racer attracting particular attention. Based on their RS-M mountain bike, the geometry has been tweaked for drop bars, with J.Paks bags carrying all your need for a few hundred miles, and a night outside.

Boo Bicycles - NAHBS

Boo Bicycles - NAHBS

Boo Bicycles - NAHBS

Boo Bicycles - NAHBS

Boo Bicycles - NAHBS

Silent Cycles – Nashville, Tennessee

There was no paint on this bike from Silent Cycles to hide imperfections, or to shield the frame from oxidation. As one can see from the patina and drivetrain gunk, this show bike has already seen a few hundred miles in the real world. Once the patina has progressed, the bike will be wiped down with boiled linseed oil to stop any further oxidation, locking in an aged appearance. Note the thru-axles and pass-through rear derailleur cable routing.

Silent Cycles - NAHBS

Silent Cycles - NAHBS

Silent Cycles - NAHBS  Silent Cycles - NAHBS

Silent Cycles - NAHBS

Silent Cycles - NAHBS

Silent Cycles - NAHBS

Silent Cycles - NAHBS

Silent Cycles - NAHBSSilent Cycles - NAHBS

Lundbeck Cycles – Cincinnati, Ohio

This paint doesn’t just draw you in, it has a story. Builder Max Lundbeck’s family has a small box of heirlooms handed down through the the first son to have a son of each generation, dating all the way back to Olaf in 1797. In 2013 Max beat his twin brother to having a son, secured his place as family history keeper, and eventually hatched the idea of this paint with every owner of the Lundbeck box listed around the seat tube. Practicing engineer by day, framebuilder by night, somewhere in between Max will get the chance to put the miles on his own beautiful build.

Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBS

Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBS

Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBS

Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBS

Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBS

Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBS

Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBS

Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBS  Lundbeck Cycles - NAHBSLundbeck Cycles - NAHBS

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